mass-symposium-abstracts

Colin Black: RADIO ART: AN ACOUSTIC MEDIA ART FORM

It seems obvious, if you take radio out of radio art then you have a sound based art work that is not broadcasted, unicasted and/or multicasted; conversely if you take art out of radio art then you have radio …
This paper explores the idea of radio art as a media based acoustic art-form and argues that the Australian works Journal (1969) by David Ahern’s and Quadrophonic Cocktail (1986) by Chris Mann are forms of acoustic media art.
Further to this it examines the absence of radio art as a formal course of study in Australia (especially for under graduates) and argues for the need to include radio art and its vibrant Australian history to be acknowledged within formal academic institutes.

2 Responses to “Colin Black: RADIO ART: AN ACOUSTIC MEDIA ART FORM”

  1. Colin Black Says:

    N.B. My abstract has slightly evolved.

    Perhaps it’s obvious; if we take radio out of radio art then we usually have a sound based art work that is not broadcasted, unicasted and/or multicasted; conversely if we take the ‘art’ out of radio art then you have radio (in all of its conventional formats) … but do we have radio art if we simply combine radio and art?

    This paper explores the idea of radio art as a media based acoustic art form and argues that the Australian works Journal (1969) by David Ahern and Quadrophonic Cocktail (1986) by Chris Mann are forms of acoustic media art.

    Further to this, it asks is there a role for radio art in education?

  2. Jeremy Blank Says:

    The issue of teaching radio art? WHere should this be sited….
    within NIDA or communications courses or art schools?
    Within Radio & television I dread to imagine what bloody awful fare would be carted out, (NIDA is case in reference)
    mainstream approaches beget mainstream work and there is little ‘art’ in those institutions.
    Within art schools or universities there are few staff with the credentials to service such an area.
    The Americans have some provision for the area, the French have had ERCAM for many years.
    Radio Art is a highly specialised area..
    There are two big words
    RADIO
    and
    ART.
    There needs to be a concerted understanding of what would be required,
    what potential take up or student numbers may be realised?
    Within the term RADIO there exists the medium of sound,
    sound within the context of ‘art’ rather than ‘music’ is one that has defied and defined many institutions for years around the world.
    It requires technical expertise as well as a clear understanding of the medium’s history and variety of forms, much as any other artform.
    It is clear that there are few qualified specialists who would have the depth or breadth to provide adequate technical, conceptual and contextual knowledge within what is a highly specialised area….
    I do not perceive that there would be any benefit in seeking to attempt a mass evangelical approach to the promotion of sound art…
    There is however a need to ensure that sound art is promoted, provided for and respected as an historical and contemporary form
    but wait, what about poetry, an equally specialist and little publicised area of the arts….
    Poetry is both a sonic and text based art form, but if RADIO ART were taught within English departments there would be equal concerns over the content
    and form of the outcomes.
    But as Colin said in Melbourne, if the ARt Gallery of NSW were knocked down without debate, there would be justifiable uproar
    and that is clearly what happened with the demise of Radio National’s ‘Listening Room’
    This issue is so large and of such importance it requires serious consideration, on many levels.

Leave a Reply